lowest Court new arrival of Thorns outlet sale and Roses (A Court of Thorns and Roses) outlet sale

lowest Court new arrival of Thorns outlet sale and Roses (A Court of Thorns and Roses) outlet sale

lowest Court new arrival of Thorns outlet sale and Roses (A Court of Thorns and Roses) outlet sale
lowest Court new arrival of Thorns outlet sale and Roses (A Court of Thorns and Roses) outlet sale__below

Description

Product Description

The sexy, action-packed first book in the #1 New York Times bestselling Court of Thorns and Roses series from Sarah J. Maas.

When nineteen-year-old huntress Feyre kills a wolf in the woods, a terrifying creature arrives to demand retribution. Dragged to a treacherous magical land she knows about only from legends, Feyre discovers that her captor is not truly a beast, but one of the lethal, immortal faeries who once ruled her world.

At least, he’s not a beast all the time.

As she adapts to her new home, her feelings for the faerie, Tamlin, transform from icy hostility into a fiery passion that burns through every lie she’s been told about the beautiful, dangerous world of the Fae. But something is not right in the faerie lands. An ancient, wicked shadow is growing, and Feyre must find a way to stop it, or doom Tamlin―and his world―forever.

From bestselling author Sarah J. Maas comes a seductive, breathtaking book that blends romance, adventure, and faerie lore into an unforgettable read.

Review

“Simply dazzles.” - starred review, Booklist on A Court of Thorns and Roses

“Passionate, violent, sexy and daring…. A true page-turner.” - USA Today on A COURT OF THORNS AND ROSES

“Suspense, romance, intrigue and action. This is not a book to be missed!” - Huffington Post on A COURT OF THORNS AND ROSES

“Vicious and intoxicating…. A dazzling world, complex characters and sizzling romance.” - Top Pick, RT Book Reviews on A COURT OF THORNS AND ROSES

“A sexy, action-packed fairytale.” - Bustle on A COURT OF THORNS AND ROSES

“Fiercely romantic, irresistibly sexy and hypnotically magical. A veritable feast for the senses.” - USA Today on A COURT OF MIST AND FURY

“Hits the spot for fans of dark, lush, sexy fantasy.” - Kirkus Reviews on A COURT OF MIST AND FURY

“An immersive, satisfying read.” - Publishers Weekly on A COURT OF MIST AND FURY

“Darkly sexy and thrilling.” - Bustle on A COURT OF MIST AND FURY

“Fast-paced and explosively action-packed.” - Booklist on A COURT OF WINGS AND RUIN

“The plot manages to seduce you with its alluring characters, irresistible world and never-ending action, leaving you craving more.” - RT Book Reviews on A COURT OF WINGS AND RUIN

About the Author

Sarah J. Maas is the #1 New York Times and internationally bestselling author of the Throne of Glass, Court of Thorns and Roses, and Crescent City series. Her books have sold millions of copies and are published in thirty-seven languages. Sarah lives with her husband, son, and dog.

sarahjmaas.com
facebook.com/theworldofsarahjmaas
instagram.com/therealsjmaas

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Top reviews from the United States

Anne Pruitt
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
ACOTAR is nothing more than erotica
Reviewed in the United States on November 13, 2018
So here I sit, having gone through the OMG ACOTAR SERIES IS AMAZING phase, and out the other end, I can sit back and think "What the actual hell?" I''m a HUGE Maas fan, so when I found out she was writing another series, I had to have it. For the first time in a... See more
So here I sit, having gone through the OMG ACOTAR SERIES IS AMAZING phase, and out the other end, I can sit back and think "What the actual hell?"

I''m a HUGE Maas fan, so when I found out she was writing another series, I had to have it. For the first time in a long time, my library actually got the book within a month of its release, so I checked out ACOTAR and read it in a single day. I loved it.

Books two came out, and while I was super disappointed in the pointless sex thrown in every so often and whole chapters dedicated to this nonsense, I continued reading because the story was compelling enough. And then ACOWAR emerged, and everything changed.

This was a series I read numerous times before ACOWAR came out, and I saw things that genuinely bothered me, but I ignored them (I don''t even know why) until I just couldn''t stand it anymore.

ACOTAR is nothing more than erotica. I feel like the series as a whole started out with plans of being some sort of "story" porn that has a kick-ass plot with "hot" scenes thrown in for whatever reason, and then it got to ACOWAR and decided it wanted to be The Bachelor or a soap opera instead.

The relationship between Tamlin and Feyre GREATLY disturbs me. She''s taking care of her family and he swoops in after she accidentally kills a fae (who was disguised as a wolf int he woods where hunters hunt...) and takes her away, claiming she''s going to be in trouble and damned and blah blah. No, she''s pampered and given servants and pretty clothes and good food. Tamlin dresses her up like a doll and makes snide remarks when she falls short of his goals (fae goals, mind you).

Feyre is a HUMAN. Tamlin is fae. He acts like her humanity is a curse or something to hold against her, and he constantly makes remarks about how she''s too fragile, too uneducated, too plain, etc. Instead of "fixing" these issues, Tamlin does nothing other than tell her what to do and not do.

He sexually assaults her after Calanmai, and in the book Feyre shows how much she does not want his advances, and he shoves her against the wall and BITES her, then tells her not to ever go against him again. How is this OK? If my husband ever did this to me, I''d kick him in the crotch and leave. This is not OK. This is not a relationship. This is abuse, which is why it disgusts me that people go on and on about Tamlin.

The fact that Feyre and Tamlin have sex at a later time after he did this makes it worse. why, Feyre, are you going to throw yourself at a man who A) Doesn''t care about you based off his degrading comments and B) threatens you. Not only that, he basically blames her for a near-rape experience when he literally did nothing to look out for her and/or stop the guys who were going to attack her?

That being said, I have a lot of issues with Feyre. She gets off too easy on everything, and it''s like her brain is only wired to care if the dude is hot. You take care of your family, but then you walk into Tamlin''s embrace after the things he has said and done. I understand she has been abused by this, but at the same time, she could have said no. Death is a lot better than basically being a sex slave or punching bag to an immortal person determined to imprison you until you die.

She''s never punished for killing a fae. Lucien and Tamlin tell her about magical creatures that could give her what she wants, and the next day she walks out and finds them...the elusive creatures...that are hard for fae to find?

Lucien is about the only well developed character, and he''s too sexualized sometimes for me to take me seriously. If you keep pointing out the abs, tanned skin, or whatever on the dude, you''re turning them into a slab of meat. All of the males, and truthfully the females as well, in ACOTAR are "perfect" in the idea of what today''s society thinks is beauty, sexy, and amazing at everything. This is sexist on every account. Your characters become nothing more than fantasies--which is why I say this is nothing more than porn/erotica.

Sure, you can get some great messages out of this series, but is it worth all of the dung in the way? Specifically with the later books, there''s too much sex at some points for it to even be OK. Please, go try to have sex that many times or for days on end and tell me how that is. if you can do that, I''m sorry, but you''re either a whore or you''re just kinda crazy, because that''s too much.

Why I ever read this book and like it, I truthfully don''t know, but I''m done with this series. I''m done with this fandom, and I''m fed up with seeing people "swoon" or make comments or even draw/like at that nude art about LITERARY CHARACTERS. Guys, seriously? This is not a book for young girls, but when I went to the first (and last) Maas event, most of the audience there were between the ages of 14-20 (predominately 15-17 years of age) and SCREAMED when Maas was mentioning SEX SCENES. I''m not going to continue to support a series that is encouraging young teens and young women to have unrealistic ideas of men as well as sexual fantasies, especially the married women who I''ve seen act this same way. if I were your husband, I wouldn''t be able to deal with that. I wouldn''t want those books in my house.

About the only good thing I have to say for ACOTAR was that there actually was a plot in this book, and it was good, if insanely slow to get rolling, and the amount of sex was fairly minimal.
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Kindle Customer
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Wow. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
Reviewed in the United States on October 27, 2018
I hate rating books this poorly, seeing how difficult it is to write one at all (let alone a good one). But that said, I have to. I didn’t care at all for the main character, Feyre. She wasn’t just clueless, she was downright unintelligent. She knows... See more
I hate rating books this poorly, seeing how difficult it is to write one at all (let alone a good one).

But that said, I have to.

I didn’t care at all for the main character, Feyre. She wasn’t just clueless, she was downright unintelligent. She knows nothing about faeries or their powers at all, and yet consistently ignores everything everyone tries to tell her about them. The only way she got through the book and made it to the end is because she was constantly being rescued. Otherwise she would’ve died as soon as the first little mishap on Tamlin’s lands took place. But seeing as how she’s constantly rewarded for her follies, she just keeps doing the same thing again and again.

This part actually made me laugh - when she makes it to the court Under the Mountain (in spite of everything and everyone) and is standing in front of Amarantha, after being warned ferociously about her again and again:
“And as I stared into her black eyes, I realized I was going to die.” Wow, really? She literally just figured that out? I highlighted that place in the book and am just amazed by it.

Another example of her unintelligence is when Amarantha tells her the riddle. Coming in to this book fresh, with no prior knowledge about the plot at all, I guessed the answer to the riddle when I first read it. But Feyre, claiming to love Tamlin oh so deeply (which by the way she discards him in the second book, I see), does not guess it until conveniently at the very end for some reason, after she’s gone through all the trials. Also I really fail to see why Amarantha decides to hinge everything on whether or not Feyre could figure out a riddle. Anyone with a shred more intelligence than Feyre would’ve guessed it instantly and Amarantha would have been defeated.

The only reason I finished the book is because I like to finish what I start and it was a mildly interesting plot aside from the main character. I cannot recommend this book at all personally. But I know there are lots of other people who like it. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
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Jessica
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not for people who appreciate literature or the art of storytelling
Reviewed in the United States on December 11, 2018
Really, really, really, really terrible writing. You know how in filmmaking, you have text and then you have texture, and the two together is what makes a really great movie? Well those categories apply well to storytelling as well, and this book is all text. I could see... See more
Really, really, really, really terrible writing. You know how in filmmaking, you have text and then you have texture, and the two together is what makes a really great movie? Well those categories apply well to storytelling as well, and this book is all text. I could see how these books'' basic building blocks could make for a compelling story. Unfortunately, the execution falls completely flat. The texture is completely nonexistent. If you appreciate good writing at all, DO NOT READ THIS BOOK. It is shocking to me that so many people like these books so much. Seriousl,y do yourself a favor: if you like good books, don''t read this one. However, if you like sex scenes interspersed among a poorly told story, by all means go right ahead, you will love this.
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Molli Brown
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Just buy all three and save yourself the time scrambling between books...
Reviewed in the United States on August 3, 2017
For the past few years, I have been pining for a series that would come close to captivating me as much as my favorite series of all had previously done... Harry Potter. No, I would never compare between the two, I simply correlate the depth to which both series had such a... See more
For the past few years, I have been pining for a series that would come close to captivating me as much as my favorite series of all had previously done... Harry Potter. No, I would never compare between the two, I simply correlate the depth to which both series had such a dramatic effect on me and the extent to which I fully dove into each book.

People... I''m a mom, I have a life, and NO time to read. I read this series in under 5 days.

I honestly thought, just from reading reviews and plot lines that this was just another supernatural series, destined to not live up to it''s great predecessors of supernatural series greatness. I even waited to read this after I bought it. I was SO wrong with my initial thinking.
I fell into this series.. into the words. The characters. The plot. Everything about this book had me so enveloped into the story and world. I just completed the third book, and I am re-reading this first one again because I do not want to escape the magic of the world Sarah J. Maas has thrown me head-first into. I could not stop reading until I finished the last book and I still beg for more, as any good series would leave you wanting.

Read this book if you... Want to find yourself 6 hours later, finished with a book and buying the second one immediately following finishing the first; need a good romance novel; want to lose yourself in an amazing series; love books that leave you weak in the knees, crying uncontrollably, breathless, or so excited you''re hurling your fist in the air without realizing (yes, my husband was REALLY confused)..; enjoyed Harry Potter, or Twilight, or Pride and Prejudice, Romeo and Juliet, Hunger Games, The Alchemist, The Magicians, The Goldfinch... or etc.etc.etc... ; want to read something that you will remember forever.... THIS is the book, and series, you should read.
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leeharrison
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I''ve Read Better Fan Fiction
Reviewed in the United States on June 19, 2019
I usually love YA Fiction, but this hot mess of a series is dismal. The actual writing is so bad I often had to turn back to figure out who was doing the talking or who was being referred to. The incomplete sentences, botched tenses and pronouns were very distracting.... See more
I usually love YA Fiction, but this hot mess of a series is dismal. The actual writing is so bad I often had to turn back to figure out who was doing the talking or who was being referred to. The incomplete sentences, botched tenses and pronouns were very distracting. Apparently the designation "immortal" only applies until the character dies and "magic" is only part-time. The cast of characters is huge, many with similar, non-gendered names. Apparently new "powers" occurred to the author as she was writing books two and three; new powers pop up on established characters as the series progresses. And then there are the random sex scenes which are clumsy at best and certainly inappropriate for YA fiction. Like watching an accident, I couldn''t turn away; I actually read the first three in the series. It hurts my heart that writing this bad can receive such rave reviews and have such a huge following. I''m done slumming...going back to real literature.
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Kindle Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not a perfect book, but a good book 1.
Reviewed in the United States on October 2, 2017
I bought the trilogy. All together they were the best books I''ve read in a while. Separately, they were not perfect but I''m okay with that. I read a lot and tend to dislike books that show no character growth, or have wishy-washy villains, or have insta-love, or have love... See more
I bought the trilogy. All together they were the best books I''ve read in a while. Separately, they were not perfect but I''m okay with that. I read a lot and tend to dislike books that show no character growth, or have wishy-washy villains, or have insta-love, or have love result from H saving h from sexual violation, or suffer from deus ex machina. I don''t particularly care if something is obvious because sometimes I want to read something that is easy and obvious. My brain doesn''t want to be challenged 24/7. Also, I love good dialogue- dialogue makes a romantic connection feel real rather than insta-lovey. Is dialogue action-packed? No. Does it slow down pacing? You bet. At this point, you''re probably wondering where this review is going? Well, I think that knowing more about me as a reader might make it easier to see/ relate to my views for this book.

Now the fun stuff! ***SPOILERS***

Feyre (the h):
This character is complex and goes through several changes throughout the series. In this book, she has her ups and downs. Initially, she is hardened, street-smart and capable with a cynical eye toward romance and happiness and outright hatred and prejudice towards the fae. She also has love for a family who seems to dislike and neglect her. She is not very likeable. But does that make a book bad? No. (Hello, Wuthering Heights.) It is, however, more rare to write an h this way because readers in general tend to want to relate to an h, particularly when it''s written in 1st person perspective. So many readers might not be able to get into the story because of their dislike for Feyre. When the far remove her burdens that largely drove who she was, Feyre changes. She doesn''t have a purpose to keep her going, to shape her. The pacing of the book suffers a bit here while she tries to sort herself out. She tries to make love and painting her new purposes, and while she has the determination to do so, the fit just isn''t right. Does this make the book bad? No. While many people won''t like to read about an h that seems somehow "less" this downward arc was necessary to fuel the inevitable reversal toward a more fitting purpose. It drags a bit for sure, but makes the reversal feel more right, more true later on. Did she rush into something with Tamlin. Her feelings do feel a bit rushed but ultimately fit her as a character- going all-in has always been her style from the start. In that sense, the character is consistent. Also, her reluctance to voice her love made me think that deep-down she might have confused love with gratitude. Tamlin was her savior in many ways. For all of these reasons I liked Feyre.

Tamlin (the H):
Tamlin was the 1st high fae Feyre had any meaningful interactions with in the 1st book. I never really liked him as an H. He was pretty but basically hollow. He struggles with uncontrolled rage. He had just as much hatred for humans as Feyre did for fae, and his elitist attitude was hinted at throughout this book (though not substantiated until book 2). He also adheres to fae tradition in weird ways- his willing participation in the Fire Night ritual is distasteful because it borders on infidelity (especially since we later learn in book 2 that he can designate a replacement). Tamlin has from the beginning been primarily focused on Tamlin. When things get tough, he sends Feyre away; he doesn''t consult or listen to her, but just decides, hinting at his desire to treat her like a possession rather than a person. When he gets a moment of freedom under the mountain he attempts to have sex with Feyre (his wants) instead of trying to escape with or save her (her needs). When Feyre is dying, he can only bring himself to beg for her life, he isn''t moved into action. All of these things hint that Tamlin is not a good fit for Feyre. Many readers will not like to read about an H that is so lacking/ ill-fitted. The beautiful part is that these things are only ever hinted at in the writing, not outright stated so you will want to root for Tamlin while also feeling something inexplicably lacking in him. I thought about it lots before I picked up book 2, where my thoughts regarding Tamlin were cemented. Tamlin could not have been written more likeable though. If he was the perfect H then Feyre falling for Rhys in book 2 would have felt like a betrayal, instead of fated, and then Feyre would''ve been worse than unlikable but detestable as an h.

Lucian:
A secondary character who is both interesting and flawed. He hates Feyre at first, but ultimately warms up to her. He is loyal to a fault, siding with Tamlin over and again, even when he thinks it is wrong to do so. A trait that becomes more obvious as the series progresses. Lucian has potential.

Rhysand (villain/other H):
Rhysand was the most interesting character in the book (although Nesta was a close second). Rhys was the evil queen''s right-hand man. He has done terrible things. Yet, when we meet him (not my favorite bit of the book because of the gross circumstances I do not favor, as mentioned above) there is evidence that he is not all that he seems. He appeared to be interested in Feyre romantically, but the "why" part is not there. Also, it is not 100% certain WHAT drives his actions. He is a mystery. Why did he decide to help her time and again? Why, if he likes her did he decide to put her through nightly humiliation? Why use her to torment Tamlin? He is clearly not 100% a good guy. He is complex.

Other things people often talk about:
The sex. There is a lot more sex in this book than in other "YA" books. It seems like that has somehow lead to some amount of controversy. I find that notion very strange as many eons ago when I was a teen, sex was a big part of being a teen- whether or not to have it, who had it, when they had it where and how, what type of birth control to use, etc. Suggestions that a book would have any type of influence on those things are just silly. Teens have sex. It''s a fact. Wishing it otherwise does nothing productive. Also, the sex in this series is not "explicit." Every time I see this adjective used, it makes me laugh. I have read many romances and even some erotica. If you truly want something "explicit" check out erotica- phrases like "the apex of my thighs" or the "the length of him" are not "explicit."
The copious dialogue. Lots of readers don''t like the extended dialogue and also wish to have seen more of the fae world. I am just guessing here, but I am thinking that they are meaning that they wanted less talk and more fairy magic. But, fae are known for more than just their magic. Another key attribute of fae has to do with their words- being able to only speak in rhyme, only speak the truth, answer any question posed, etc. This attribute can be very interesting (see Mortal Instruments series or Dresden Files). And indeed it was put to use throughout the series, sometimes well done other times much too dues ex machina for my liking. Dialogue can be a type of action when done well enough. In this book, it probably could''ve been better but was good enough for me.

The Fire Night and rape culture. Honestly, I am bothered by this one. I am never fond of rape or sexual violence as a plot device which is why I tend to avoid historical romances almost entirely. In this book, I think the Fire Nite ritual was used in part explain a bit about fae magic and in part to push forward the Feyre-Tamlin relationship while introducing Rhys. I think it both went too far and not far enough. Tamlin''s participation cheapens his feelings toward Feyre, just imagine someone saying, "I love you, truly, but I need to go have sex with someone else." And then he came back to Feyre AFTER HAVING SEX WITH SOMEONE ELSE, and bit her to clearly show his possession of her. It doesn''t sit well, does it? Additionally, the three fae with bad intentions suggest to Feyre that fae tradition gives them the right to violate her just because she is present. That makes all fae seem brutal and detestable. Thus, it goes too far. But, what about the converse? The Fire Night ritual is supposed to be necessary to ensure the bounty of the land for the next year. But, the spring court is the only court that has/ observes this ritual en mass? That does not really make sense to me. The need for this ritual, especially considering mated bonds are a rare and extremely valued thing, is not properly explained. It really could''ve been omitted from the book and is one of the few things about the book that I truly did not like.
The masks. Some people like them, some don''t. The reason given for them was that they were yet another obstacle to a human girl falling in love with Tamlin. I really didn''t mind them but I did not like Feyre''s reaction to the removal of the masks. While it was consistent with her character (she always had an eye for pretty guys), I thought that it cheapened her character to have her feel relieved that Tamlin was so pretty without his mask. It was very superficial, and further proof that there wasn''t much of substance to their "love."

While book 1 is my least favorite of the series, I still really liked it and will definitely re-read it again. Books 2 and 3 get even better and I am looking forward to further writings as well. Hopefully we will get to see what happens to Nesta, Elaine, the 6th queen, and Bryaxis.
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Iza
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Kind of disappointed
Reviewed in the United States on January 7, 2019
Writing this review is hard and tricky. Why? Because I both liked and disliked the book. I liked the writing style, pulls you right in, and Feyre. She''s a strong, flawed character, who grows throughout the book. I also liked the lore part, with the... See more
Writing this review is hard and tricky.

Why?

Because I both liked and disliked the book. I liked the writing style, pulls you right in, and Feyre. She''s a strong, flawed character, who grows throughout the book. I also liked the lore part, with the faeries and all, and the similarities between it and Beauty and the Beast.

But that''s it. There are some mild spoilers coming up, so continue only if you wish to know.

Feyre is the only one that takes care of her family. She''s the only one that hunts and makes sure they get to eat and have all the necessary things. Not a lot but better than nothing. Until she kills a wolf that turns out to be a faerie. Another one comes to seek revenge and gives Feyre a choice: go with him or die. See, the Faeries and humans were not on friendly terms and it was a big no-no to kill Faeries.

Or was it?

As I said, the story is very similar to Beauty and the Beast, so you pretty much know what happens. Feyre hates Tamlin, but throughout the months spent together, the things they go through, they fall in love. And then the big bad Faerie comes out to play and well, this is pretty much where it went downhill. To be honest, I wasn''t liking Tamlin. I kept waiting for him to make me swoon but nada. Was it because I knew what would happen in book two? Which, to be honest, I just don''t get.

Why make the heroine go through hell and back for the Faerie she loves, only to have her switch heroes?

Right now, I''m not interested in reading the other books in the series. Will that change? I don''t know. But I''m actually disappointed by it, hence the weak 3 star rating. And unpopular opinion.
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Vanessa
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
dub-con, non-con
Reviewed in the United States on August 16, 2020
Look this is gonna be spoilers but only for the one aspect of the book that made me so mad I had to put it down for good so I feel like I have to be specific. It''s a Beauty and the Beast story. I get it. But there was a scene where the "beast" character gets pretty violent,... See more
Look this is gonna be spoilers but only for the one aspect of the book that made me so mad I had to put it down for good so I feel like I have to be specific. It''s a Beauty and the Beast story. I get it. But there was a scene where the "beast" character gets pretty violent, followed by him laughing about it with his other guy friend the next day, followed by... the "beauty" character finally coming around on him and starting to wear the dresses he bought her and like... girl THAT''S WHAT DID IT FOR YOU?? He wasn''t attractive until the instant he started being abusive and threatening? I hate this. I hate it. That''s fine if that''s your thing in won''t judge you (much) but just know what you''re getting into.
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Letícia
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Edição fantástica!
Reviewed in Brazil on June 8, 2020
Com certeza o livro mais bonito da minha estante! O primeiro livro da trilogia não é o melhor, nem de longe, mas quem é fã da Sarah e da trilogia precisa dele! Lindo demais, estou apaixonada!
Com certeza o livro mais bonito da minha estante! O primeiro livro da trilogia não é o melhor, nem de longe, mas quem é fã da Sarah e da trilogia precisa dele! Lindo demais, estou apaixonada!
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Jade
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Warning: Plagiarism
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 31, 2021
This is such a sad state of affairs. This author is TECHNICALLY a good writer, but unfortunately she completely lacks her own imagination. I gave this author the benefit of the doubt to begin with, but the problems just kept piling up. I was surprised to find so many...See more
This is such a sad state of affairs. This author is TECHNICALLY a good writer, but unfortunately she completely lacks her own imagination. I gave this author the benefit of the doubt to begin with, but the problems just kept piling up. I was surprised to find so many similarities to Anne Bishop''s Black Jewels series, so I did a google search and found that despite her success, Maas is a well-known plagiarist. Characters that are bland versions of Bishops, entire scenes that are completely lifted from the Black Jewels books (and the plagiarism gets even worse in the second book in this series by Maas). It''s not even inspiration or fan-fiction when one author completely copies entire scenes, plots and character traits and backstories. After doing some research, I find myself utterly baffled at the situation. How there haven''t been lawsuits, I do not know. Especially since Maas has apparently plagiarised other authors too. I''ve only read Anne Bishop, so I can''t speak to the validity of the other claims... but I can 100% confirm the Anne Bishop one. It starts off fairly subtle with just phrases and titles, but by book two, as I said above, she actually lifts entire scenes from Bishop. Exact scenes. That''s where I finally gave up. That''s where I became TOO ANGRY to carry on. I beg of anyone thinking of reading this: Do your research about this author. And please just read Anne''s work instead. It''s original. You won''t be funding and contributing to the success of a copy-cat.
This is such a sad state of affairs. This author is TECHNICALLY a good writer, but unfortunately she completely lacks her own imagination. I gave this author the benefit of the doubt to begin with, but the problems just kept piling up. I was surprised to find so many similarities to Anne Bishop''s Black Jewels series, so I did a google search and found that despite her success, Maas is a well-known plagiarist. Characters that are bland versions of Bishops, entire scenes that are completely lifted from the Black Jewels books (and the plagiarism gets even worse in the second book in this series by Maas). It''s not even inspiration or fan-fiction when one author completely copies entire scenes, plots and character traits and backstories.

After doing some research, I find myself utterly baffled at the situation. How there haven''t been lawsuits, I do not know. Especially since Maas has apparently plagiarised other authors too. I''ve only read Anne Bishop, so I can''t speak to the validity of the other claims... but I can 100% confirm the Anne Bishop one. It starts off fairly subtle with just phrases and titles, but by book two, as I said above, she actually lifts entire scenes from Bishop. Exact scenes. That''s where I finally gave up. That''s where I became TOO ANGRY to carry on.

I beg of anyone thinking of reading this: Do your research about this author. And please just read Anne''s work instead. It''s original. You won''t be funding and contributing to the success of a copy-cat.
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Miss K. Southern
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
It took me a lot longer to get through this one than I would have liked, mostly because despite the fact that I did ...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 26, 2018
So I finally finished a Sarah J. Maas book! It''s been a long time coming, but of course I was going to end up reading this one - a combined re-imagining of ''Beauty & The Beast'' and the lesser known Scottish folk tale ''Tam Lin''. It took me a lot longer to get through this...See more
So I finally finished a Sarah J. Maas book! It''s been a long time coming, but of course I was going to end up reading this one - a combined re-imagining of ''Beauty & The Beast'' and the lesser known Scottish folk tale ''Tam Lin''. It took me a lot longer to get through this one than I would have liked, mostly because despite the fact that I did like it, I couldn''t quite bring myself to fall in love. As far as MCs go, Feyre was pretty good. She was tough and realistic, though at times her tendency to inner ramble wore on me. Tamlin, her love interest, I quite liked at first but as the book progressed I realised that not only did I begin to question a few of his motives as more of his past was revealed, I found him a bit too dull: especially in comparison to characters filled with personality such as Rhysand and Lucien. It will be interesting to see how they and Nesta (who I think has SO much potential) develop in Book Two, as well as whether I continue to like Tamlin as the object of Feyre''s affections. I feel like Maas might be trying to sneak in a Hades & Persephone style story-line in the future and I have to say if I''m right then it''s ramped up my excitement for ''A Court Of Mist & Fury'' tenfold! The world-building is nicely introduced though I still felt it skimped on some of the details, choosing to take more of an info-dumping approach later on via Alis rather than using more of that time that Feyre spends prancing and painting around the Spring Court. The thing is, I DO really want to know what happens next but I can''t bring myself to lie and say that this book gave me that blown away feeling. It''s a really good story on creatures that are rarely focused on: the Fae. But I never felt truly gripped by the plot (the pacing was a little hot and cold) and can''t help but feel like I wanted more from a book that set the Blogging world on fire that was written by a widely loved Author in the YA Fantasy community.
So I finally finished a Sarah J. Maas book! It''s been a long time coming, but of course I was going to end up reading this one - a combined re-imagining of ''Beauty & The Beast'' and the lesser known Scottish folk tale ''Tam Lin''. It took me a lot longer to get through this one than I would have liked, mostly because despite the fact that I did like it, I couldn''t quite bring myself to fall in love.

As far as MCs go, Feyre was pretty good. She was tough and realistic, though at times her tendency to inner ramble wore on me. Tamlin, her love interest, I quite liked at first but as the book progressed I realised that not only did I begin to question a few of his motives as more of his past was revealed, I found him a bit too dull: especially in comparison to characters filled with personality such as Rhysand and Lucien. It will be interesting to see how they and Nesta (who I think has SO much potential) develop in Book Two, as well as whether I continue to like Tamlin as the object of Feyre''s affections. I feel like Maas might be trying to sneak in a Hades & Persephone style story-line in the future and I have to say if I''m right then it''s ramped up my excitement for ''A Court Of Mist & Fury'' tenfold! The world-building is nicely introduced though I still felt it skimped on some of the details, choosing to take more of an info-dumping approach later on via Alis rather than using more of that time that Feyre spends prancing and painting around the Spring Court.

The thing is, I DO really want to know what happens next but I can''t bring myself to lie and say that this book gave me that blown away feeling. It''s a really good story on creatures that are rarely focused on: the Fae. But I never felt truly gripped by the plot (the pacing was a little hot and cold) and can''t help but feel like I wanted more from a book that set the Blogging world on fire that was written by a widely loved Author in the YA Fantasy community.
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Tackfiction
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This one is good, the sequel is even better...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 15, 2017
So, where do I begin? This book has such a following its hard to really say anything that hasn’t already been said but I shall do my best. The story starts off with a ‘Beauty and The Beast’ vibe that mingles with a Hunger Games-y, Cinderella-esque type main character and a...See more
So, where do I begin? This book has such a following its hard to really say anything that hasn’t already been said but I shall do my best. The story starts off with a ‘Beauty and The Beast’ vibe that mingles with a Hunger Games-y, Cinderella-esque type main character and a super mysterious plot. However, it quickly develops into much more than that as we gradually discover more and more about the Faerie world and the creatures who inhabit it. Something I liked about the plot (and something that seems to be a trend among YA fiction at the moment – see Caraval) was the way Mass played with the idea of truth. A Court of Thorns and Roses invites the reader to question a great deal of what we read on the page, making it both more unpredictable and more magical. In terms of ‘overall outcome’ the plot was fairly typical but this didn’t really take away from the story. The only part I found a little disappointing was the way the key romantic relationship shifts after about half-way through. I think I’ve guessed events in the sequel purely because later descriptions of the couple seem to indicate that Maas is no longer invested in it – it will be interesting to see how it all plays out. (I hope it plays out in a particular way) I totally ship Rhys – I’m not even ashamed. He’s so much more interesting than Tamlin. I really enjoyed the way Maas made faeries so acutely unlike traditional ‘fairy’ images. The raw, animal nature of the Fae characters was fun to read and I liked the little canine and feline behavioural traits she used. Feyre’s character is still kind of growing on me though – I was disappointed that she was given quite so much help by male characters in later chapters, it really took away from the gender tropes the opening chapters challenged. The weak father and strong daughter juxtaposition paired with the female Mercenary was a good opener and I’d definitely like to read more about the briefly introduced mercenary. Nesta, I think, actually proved to be one of the most intriguing characters and I’d really like to read more about her too. Don’t get me wrong, the faeries are cool and all, I just feel like her character was compelling and utterly human – and, really, there’s some magic in that too. She pulls a full 360 and goes from evil step-sister to loyal protector, a character arc I just really felt was worth mentioning. She’s so magically human that she defies magic, I hope Maas does something cool with her character. “I’d never heard of a glamour not working. But Nesta’s mind was so entirely her own; she had put up such strong walls—of steel and iron and ash wood—that even a High Lord’s magic couldn’t pierce them.” Another thing that disappointed me about this read, and perhaps the reason it doesn’t quite make it to four stars, was that I felt quite disconnected from the characters I was reading about. There are real gruesome and emotional events going on in this novel but few made my heart race and I didn’t cry – not even once. I’m not saying crying makes a book good but sad things did happen, it would’ve been a better book had I felt that in the writing. I really want to love this series and I’m hoping the second book lets me do that by just harnessing a little more emotion and tension. In summary, this was an interesting story and kept me reading till the last page. Despite all the little niggles, I really did enjoy it and I’ll definitely be picking up the sequel with high hopes.
So, where do I begin?
This book has such a following its hard to really say anything that hasn’t already been said but I shall do my best.

The story starts off with a ‘Beauty and The Beast’ vibe that mingles with a Hunger Games-y, Cinderella-esque type main character and a super mysterious plot. However, it quickly develops into much more than that as we gradually discover more and more about the Faerie world and the creatures who inhabit it.

Something I liked about the plot (and something that seems to be a trend among YA fiction at the moment – see Caraval) was the way Mass played with the idea of truth. A Court of Thorns and Roses invites the reader to question a great deal of what we read on the page, making it both more unpredictable and more magical. In terms of ‘overall outcome’ the plot was fairly typical but this didn’t really take away from the story. The only part I found a little disappointing was the way the key romantic relationship shifts after about half-way through. I think I’ve guessed events in the sequel purely because later descriptions of the couple seem to indicate that Maas is no longer invested in it – it will be interesting to see how it all plays out. (I hope it plays out in a particular way) I totally ship Rhys – I’m not even ashamed. He’s so much more interesting than Tamlin.

I really enjoyed the way Maas made faeries so acutely unlike traditional ‘fairy’ images. The raw, animal nature of the Fae characters was fun to read and I liked the little canine and feline behavioural traits she used. Feyre’s character is still kind of growing on me though – I was disappointed that she was given quite so much help by male characters in later chapters, it really took away from the gender tropes the opening chapters challenged. The weak father and strong daughter juxtaposition paired with the female Mercenary was a good opener and I’d definitely like to read more about the briefly introduced mercenary.

Nesta, I think, actually proved to be one of the most intriguing characters and I’d really like to read more about her too. Don’t get me wrong, the faeries are cool and all, I just feel like her character was compelling and utterly human – and, really, there’s some magic in that too. She pulls a full 360 and goes from evil step-sister to loyal protector, a character arc I just really felt was worth mentioning. She’s so magically human that she defies magic, I hope Maas does something cool with her character.
“I’d never heard of a glamour not working. But Nesta’s mind was so entirely her own; she had put up such strong walls—of steel and iron and ash wood—that even a High Lord’s magic couldn’t pierce them.”
Another thing that disappointed me about this read, and perhaps the reason it doesn’t quite make it to four stars, was that I felt quite disconnected from the characters I was reading about. There are real gruesome and emotional events going on in this novel but few made my heart race and I didn’t cry – not even once. I’m not saying crying makes a book good but sad things did happen, it would’ve been a better book had I felt that in the writing. I really want to love this series and I’m hoping the second book lets me do that by just harnessing a little more emotion and tension.

In summary, this was an interesting story and kept me reading till the last page. Despite all the little niggles, I really did enjoy it and I’ll definitely be picking up the sequel with high hopes.
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jek
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Mixed feelings
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 8, 2018
I have really mixed feelings about this book. OK, so it took me a long time to get through it. I devoured three other books while I kept putting this down and picking it up again. I think I found Fayre, the main character, a little hard to relate to or feel anything for. I...See more
I have really mixed feelings about this book. OK, so it took me a long time to get through it. I devoured three other books while I kept putting this down and picking it up again. I think I found Fayre, the main character, a little hard to relate to or feel anything for. I didn’t particularly like her, but there were other characters that I did like, such as Lucien, Rhysand and Nesta. Feyre likes to paint and I think this is where the empathy is supposed to come through – oh, look, she paints, so she has got a heart, but it didn’t quite hit the mark. This is at the older end of young adult with some very raunchy scenes. I didn’t mind them but it’s something to keep in mind. The writing style was stilted at times and her overuse of repetition can become distracting, pulling you out of the story rather than enhancing it. Some descriptions were just strange but then others were beautiful. It was a bit of a slow start. Towards the end I was thinking oh god, there’s still 20% left, but as it turned out that was the section I enjoyed most. This pulled it from being 2.5 stars to 3. I can see why this is such a huge hit. I have the second and third book on my kindle but I’m not sure when the mood will take me to pick them up. I’m certainly not rushing for them, but maybe they’ll keep calling out to me to be read, just like this one did.     
I have really mixed feelings about this book. OK, so it took me a long time to get through it. I devoured three other books while I kept putting this down and picking it up again.

I think I found Fayre, the main character, a little hard to relate to or feel anything for. I didn’t particularly like her, but there were other characters that I did like, such as Lucien, Rhysand and Nesta. Feyre likes to paint and I think this is where the empathy is supposed to come through – oh, look, she paints, so she has got a heart, but it didn’t quite hit the mark.

This is at the older end of young adult with some very raunchy scenes. I didn’t mind them but it’s something to keep in mind.

The writing style was stilted at times and her overuse of repetition can become distracting, pulling you out of the story rather than enhancing it. Some descriptions were just strange but then others were beautiful.

It was a bit of a slow start. Towards the end I was thinking oh god, there’s still 20% left, but as it turned out that was the section I enjoyed most. This pulled it from being 2.5 stars to 3.

I can see why this is such a huge hit. I have the second and third book on my kindle but I’m not sure when the mood will take me to pick them up. I’m certainly not rushing for them, but maybe they’ll keep calling out to me to be read, just like this one did.   

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